Douglas River House, East-Coast Tasmania
       
     
 The brief was to re-clad the existing dwelling, convert an unused garage on the lower level into a utility room and library to support the existing home office, and to provide a space on the upper level that offered an alternative to outdoor living, as extreme weather conditions on the exposed site seldom permitted outdoor activities.
       
     
douglas 05.jpg
       
     
   
  
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  Owen and Vokess' ‘peninsula type’ form was closely examined with the conception of the new family room. The theory of ‘prospect and refuge’ underpinned the design process, by which prospect emphasises view, position and surveillance, while refuge prioritises shelter, safety and containment. The architectural strategy was to balance these two elements.
       
     
douglas04.jpg
       
     
Douglas River House Retail.jpg
       
     
PLAN.jpg
       
     
Douglas River House, East-Coast Tasmania
       
     
Douglas River House, East-Coast Tasmania

Alterations and Additions.

[Completed as Project Architect for Birrelli art+design+architecture]

 The brief was to re-clad the existing dwelling, convert an unused garage on the lower level into a utility room and library to support the existing home office, and to provide a space on the upper level that offered an alternative to outdoor living, as extreme weather conditions on the exposed site seldom permitted outdoor activities.
       
     

The brief was to re-clad the existing dwelling, convert an unused garage on the lower level into a utility room and library to support the existing home office, and to provide a space on the upper level that offered an alternative to outdoor living, as extreme weather conditions on the exposed site seldom permitted outdoor activities.

douglas 05.jpg
       
     
   
  
 0 
 0 
 1 
 52 
 303 
 Canvas Communications 
 2 
 1 
 354 
 14.0 
  
  
 
  
    
  
 Normal 
 0 
 
 
 
 
 false 
 false 
 false 
 
 EN-US 
 JA 
 X-NONE 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
    
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
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  Owen and Vokess' ‘peninsula type’ form was closely examined with the conception of the new family room. The theory of ‘prospect and refuge’ underpinned the design process, by which prospect emphasises view, position and surveillance, while refuge prioritises shelter, safety and containment. The architectural strategy was to balance these two elements.
       
     

Owen and Vokess' ‘peninsula type’ form was closely examined with the conception of the new family room. The theory of ‘prospect and refuge’ underpinned the design process, by which prospect emphasises view, position and surveillance, while refuge prioritises shelter, safety and containment. The architectural strategy was to balance these two elements.

douglas04.jpg
       
     
Douglas River House Retail.jpg
       
     
PLAN.jpg